Production Costs

There are no fixed prices for an infomercial or commercial.


30 Minute Infomercial:

The cost for a 30 minute infomercial, which actually runs 28 1/2 minutes will depend on the complexity of the production. These include, but are not limited to the amount of shooting days, talent fees, script writing, location or studio days, sets, size of crew, amount of cameras, editing, animation etc. If a concept calls for two or three people simply talking to each other, with multiple cameras, the cost would be on the lower end of the scale. This type of production can be shot in one day. If the shoot calls for multiple locations, with many actors and multiple shooting days, this type of DRTV Production will run at a higher cost.

Direct Response Commercial:

Short Form Commercials are Two Minutes or One Minute in length. The price will also depend on the complexity of the production. In most cases a Two Minute commercial is produced and edited down to make a One Minute version. Beware of companies that shoot very inexpensive commercials. You need to ask them what big successes they have had and also get references. Look at their work. Do you recognize any of the commercials?

Air Time For Direct Response

Once the commercial or infomercial is produced, it is recommended to run a two week test on national cable networks for effectiveness. This test will give a strong indication of whether the spot will produce the desired results. Sometimes a slight tweak needs to be made, but is easy to edit.

Bottom Line

Marcus Productions has a long standing history of success for their clients. Feel free to contact us to discuss your needs. Allow us to make recommendations on what needs to be done, based on our years of success and experience in Direct Response Television Production. Once we have all of your information, we can estimate production costs for your project.

HERE ARE SOME THINGS TO CONSIDER FOR YOUR NEXT DRTV PROJECT

Does It Solve A Common Problem?

What you should be looking for are simple, inexpensive solutions to problems that challenge or annoy millions, yes!, millions! Most often these are labor- or time-savers, but even better are the products that let the consumer tackle jobs effectively while saving money by doing it themselves. Everyone loves a product that boosts confidence — and avoids the expense of a professional — or helps avoid common boring, messy chores.

Does It Have Perceived High Value?

Pitchmen always want to make potential customers feel like they are getting a great value for their money. This is why a pitch typically includes a line like “a $60 value all for only $19.99!” How do you make this convincing? By succeeding at all the requirements above. It’s been proven time and again that consumers will almost automatically impart a higher value to products that “solve a common problem” with minimum effort, even if the products are obviously made from simple materials with a simple design. Clever solutions that offer surprising results almost always earn a high value rating.

Does It Have Mass Market Appeal?

This is not necessarily an imperative, but if the product is seen as a potential winner among a wide range of ages, sexes, races or other demographics, the less likely you will be given the boot. One key to success in this area is to stay away from any easily avoidable exclusionary features, such as limiting gender appeal. When selling a product like the Natural Bra, for example, you’re only appealing to women and therefore your salability is cut in half. And while there are millions of golf enthusiasts, golf products only appeal to golfers.

Does It Have Room for a 4x Markup?

When developing your product, keep in mind that it needs to be produced at a cost that allows for at least “four times” markup, while still resulting in an attractive offer price. This markup is required to cover the costs of media, distribution, fulfillment, etc. In the near future, this markup level may come down since so much Direct Response TV is now used to push retail rather than just direct TV and Web sales. Still, you need to stick with inexpensive, easily manufactured components. This requirement is not as daunting as it sounds, since mass production at overseas plants can help keep costs down.

Does It Have a Patent?

This is not required, but your chances are much improved if you can ensure that competition from a similar product is not imminent. It is recommended to at least have the product Patent Pending. In any case, liability for patent infringements rest with the clients; the production company won’t get involved in patent searches.

Is the product Unique or New?

Sometimes “everything old is new again,” but other times a product comes into the arena that’s completely unique. It’s not necessary for the product to be new and unique, but if it is, then it will increase the chances that it will make it to Direct Response TV production.

Is the product Highly Demonstrable?

In other words, the product’s purpose, function and success must be easy to explain and demonstrate on Television. Complex concepts, multi-stage assembly or vague results don’t have much of a chance! There’s also got to be a visual “wow” factor that will capture the attention of the viewer, and make them not only keep watching, but compel them to buy.